Joe Morrissey comes up short in his bid to be the Democratic Torquemada

A bit of follow-up on Chris Saxman’s post regarding the Democratic primaries, from this morning’s edition of “Dead Reckoning“…

“We learned that Democratic Del. Joe Morrissey’s dreams of becoming his party’s ideological enforcer came up short, as his fellow Democratic delegate, Rosalyn Dance, easily survived the primary challenge Morrissey engineered against her. What damage does this do to Morrissey’s rumored desire for the Senate seat of Henry Marsh? We shall see. But it is worth noting that Marsh also campaigned against Dance. His political machine seems to have reached its limit.”

When Republicans have primaries, it’s portrayed as a bad thing, something that shows the party is coming apart at the seams, riven by conflict, and so on. However, rarely if ever will a Republican incumbent find his or her own colleagues recruiting and backing a challenger. Morrissey did exactly that with Rosalyn Dance and it happened before with Sen. Benjamin Lambert in 2007.

When it comes to primaries, Democratic politicians are more likely to turn on one another than Republicans. At least so far. It’s one narrative that never seems to crack the old media, whose ranks have gotten even thinner today with the closure of the Washington Examiner’s local news division.

Perhaps it’s because such contests are, in the larger scheme of things, irrelevant. House Democrats are approaching rump status, so if they occasionally take chunks out of their own hide in primaries what does it matter?

It does matter. And it is worth watching, because Joe Morrissey, and his close ally, Sen. Don McEachin, have visions of becoming the new Democratic establishment. More liberal, more strident, less willing to tolerate even the whiff of dissent within the ranks.

The very things the GOP has been accused of for since they began their rise to power just over a decade ago.