The stakes of Senate District Six…it’s more than you thinkPolitics

sixth_senateShould Democrat Lynwood Lewis defeat Republican Wayne Coleman in tomorrow’s frosty special election for the 6th Senate District, the consequences for Republicans could be worse than expected.

With the election of Democratic Senator Ralph Northam to become Virginia’s next lieutenant governor, many have discussed the possibility that Republicans could pick up the seat, breaking the 20-20 deadlock, and thus provide a second legislative check (the House of Delegates being the first), against McAuliffe administration overstretch.

While that is certainly true and conventional wisdom, there is a far more important reason for Republicans to go “all-in” today and tomorrow in supporting Norfolk businessman Wayne Coleman’s candidacy – the fact that for the first time in twenty years the state is without a Republican attorney general.

Why is this important? With the election of Democrat Mark Herring as attorney general, whose seat in Northern Virginia is almost certain to return to the Democrats (especially with Republican John Whitbeck and independent Joe May campaigning for the same voter pool), not only will all legislation pass through this progressive’s office to “be reviewed” for state constitutional muster, but Herring was unequivocal during his campaign that he would “pick and choose” which laws to enforce and which to ignore.

Don’t take my word for it.

During the last stages of the campaign, former Democratic Attorney General Andy Miller (1970-1977) – the same Miller who ran against and defeated Mark Obenshain’s father Richard (“Dick”) Obenshain in the 1969 race for Attorney General – endorsed the only Republican in his life: Mark Obenshain.

Why?

“I have seldom seen such a contrast in readiness and willingness to perform the duties of the Attorney General as we have in the race this year. I am a lifelong Democrat and have supported every Democratic candidate for Attorney General since I served from 1970-1977. But Mark Obenshain is the clear choice to lead the Attorney General’s office in a way that respects the oath of office and best serves the people of Virginia.”

“Obenshain’s opponent apparently does not understand the role of the Attorney General in Virginia’s government. I do not recall a nominee for Attorney General who refused to tell Virginians whether he will defend challenges to Virginia’s laws. Having had the privilege to serve as Virginia’s Attorney General for seven years, I know that the Commonwealth needs someone in that position who will uphold her laws and have the courage to keep that commitment, even when it may not be politically expedient,” Miller added.

The bottom-line is that all five statewide offices are now held by Democrats and even other Democrats recognize that these office-holders – the duly elected representatives of all Virginians – willingness to run roughshod over Virginia code. There’s only one way to check them: the Virginia legislature.

So, what can be done at this point in the Coleman campaign? Plenty.

The campaign has a huge GOTV effort going on and could always use more volunteers for what promises to be a record-cold election day tomorrow. Those who call the campaign office at 757.708.8815 will be warmly received and put to good use. Even if you can’t get to Norfolk, Mathews, or the Shore, there are phone calls that can be made remotely and the campaign will find a way to put all volunteers to work. They still need “ride to the polls” people, as well.

If you were disappointed in what happened last November, now is your chance to salvage something. And, certainly if you live nearby in Hampton Roads, the Eastern Shore, or Mathews County and believe in conservatism, it’s time to step it up or it will be too late.

  • David Obermark

    No matter what happens in this election, the House remains firmly in control of Republicans. Getting the Senate behind our newly elected Governor probably would not be a bad thing. Instead of having a legislature that is lock step in opposition to him, we might see more debate about which ideas are really better. I am in favor of compromise. Neither side giving up everything, just both sides giving a little.

    • http://bearingdrift.com/ J.R. Hoeft

      I’ve missed your lock-step opposition to everything I write, David! Happy New Year!

      • David Obermark

        My opposition to you is because of your lock-step position. How about you posting something towards compromise? I could get behind that. Actually you did post one of those and I applauded the efforts of the leadership you spoke about.

        • MD Russ

          David,

          Can you name a single compromise that the Democrats made when they had the majority in the Senate?

          • David Obermark

            I assume you are commenting about in the Virginia General Assembly, correct? Are you trying to say nothing was passed in the legislature while Democrats controlled the Senate and Republicans the House? Everything would have had to be a compromise wouldn’t it? I realize that when it was impossible to reach a compromise, then many things did not end up getting done.

            I also realize that that many might describe the results as gridlock. But truthfully I think we might be better served with gridlock – and that goes for the federal as well as state government.

          • MD Russ

            You’re ducking the question, David. Showing up is not a compromise.

          • David Obermark

            You want a specific example? How about redistricting? It was a pretty shabby solution (better would have been non-partisan redistricting) but it was a compromise.

          • MD Russ

            Are you kidding me? There was no compromise in redistricting. The Democrats in the Senate gerrymandered the Senate Districts grotesquely trying to maintain a majority. Get serious.

          • David Obermark

            Aren’t you being a little one sided in your criticism? Democrats gerrymandered the Senate Districts and Republicans gerrymandered the House Districts. They then each approved the other’s efforts with no major complaints. That was the compromise. You also need to consider the federal House redistricting. That one was drawn up by Republicans and the compromise was that ALL incumbents would be protected.

          • MD Russ

            David,

            There is a big difference between compromise and “log
            rolling.” If you had gone to college, something that you are highly
            disparaging about, then you might know it. But, ignorance is bliss.
            Keep putting the pedal to the medal and hope for all that government
            free stuff.

          • David Obermark

            Two horses of a different color, but they are both still horses.

            I still think the results this time around ended up being better then what we saw in 2000.

            I, along with my wife, evidently put high value on a college education or we would not have made the sacrifices we did to put our kids through college. However, while I place a high value on it, I think there are limits to that value.

            By the way, it is “pedal to the metal” with a T. You pin medals on your chest. You press the fuel pedal down to the metal of your floorboard. Common mistake. Medal rhymes better with pedal.

          • MD Russ

            I am in awe of your ability to obfuscate the argument by pole-vaulting over a mouse turd of a misspelling. If you don’t think that there is any difference between log-rolling and compromise, then you just don’t understand politics. Log-rolling is win-win. Compromise is win-lose and lose-win.

            Just out of curiosity, If there are limits to the value of a college education, then why are you making sacrifices to pay for your kids to go to college?

          • David Obermark

            Because by providing it to my kids, without a large student-loan debt, I placed them one step ahead of many of those without one. It does not guarantee results, and many without college educations get better results.

            I am in awe of your ability to obfuscate the argument by pole vaulting over a mouse turd of a difference between compromise and logrolling.

            Aren’t we getting way off topic here?

          • midwestconservative

            “non-partisan” there is no such thing.

            The “non-partisan” commission in CA which handled redistricting tilted rather visibly Left, and I’d expect that if Texas were to do the same thing as CA their Commission would tilt rather visibly to the Right.

          • David Obermark

            ANYTHING Texas would try to do to improve their redistricting would be an improvement. It would be hard to make it worse.

          • midwestconservative

            Democrats have 12 Congressional seats out of 36. They’d have more if they bothered to run any blue dogs ( instead the Donks would rather wait until the great Latino wave saves them)
            Compare that to the 15 Republican seats out of 53 total over in California. Clearly CA Democrats are far better at gerrymandering then their Texas Republican Counterparts.

    • Warmac9999

      We already have that situation at the federal level – so I guess you want a state monarchy as we’ll.

  • Downstater

    This is scary (having an AG elected who will not defend the VA constitution). Would there be any course for the legislature to impeach him for failure to perform his duties of elected office?

    On another note, though, I really wonder if they should postpone this special election due to the weather. I don’t know if the governor could do that. It is definitely going to deter people of both parties from voting. This is Green Bay, we aren’t used to this cold.

  • Downstater

    In regard to the Northern VA special election, pretty disappointing that the Republicans are probably going to screw this one up too, on top of the recent election. Basically, they tried to pull a fast one on May, is the way I understand it, so now there are 2 Republicans running.

    • http://bearingdrift.com/ J.R. Hoeft

      In the 33rd, John Whitbeck is the official GOP nominee. Joe May, a longtime Republican member of the House of Delegates, wanted to be the nominee but failed to secure the nomination. Instead, he’s running as an independent. Hence, they’re fighting over the same voter pool. As if it wasn’t going to be hard enough for a conservative to win the 33rd….

    • Ryan Gleason

      No one tried to pull anything on May. May never even lived in the 33rd District until this past month. A mass meeting was chosen by the 33rd LD committee in accordance with the Party Plan. May could have run for the nomination at that meeting but chose to run as an independent instead.

    • midwestconservative

      May was originally planning on running as an Independent.

  • midwestconservative

    Looks like Johnson has lost in HD 11 and Howell spent a lot of money for nothing. Johnson is currently at 27% of the vote with 88% of precincts reporting.

  • midwestconservative

    Wayne Coleman still leads 50-49 but it’s within recount territory. 88% precincts reporting so. Can anyone on the ground give any info on the partisan tilt of the precincts in SD 6 as far as which ones report in first.

  • Craig Scott

    http://electionresults.virginia.gov/resultsSW.aspx?type=SEN&map=CTY
    Wayne Coleman is 22 votes behind with 99.78% precincts reporting

    State of Virginia Results

    Precincts Reporting: 76/78

    2014 Special Election – OFFICIAL RESULTS

    Lynwood W. Lewis, Jr. – DEM – 10197
    B. Wayne Coleman – REP – 10175
    Write-in – 7
    Total

    Member Senate
    of Virginia – 6th District

    TOTAL
    10197
    10175
    7

    Results provided by the
    Virginia State Board of Elections

    • midwestconservative

      This is looking an awful lot like the AG race, Coleman led up until recently, Obenshain led until the close to last precincts started reporting fell behind and then pulled out a narrow win on election night. Then the verification process and the recount followed.
      Can Mr. Coleman demand a recount in a Special Election?

  • Craig Scott

    Member Senate of Virginia – 6th District (Virginia)

    Precincts
    Reporting: 76/78 – Total Ballots Cast: 0

    2014
    Special Election – OFFICIAL RESULTS

    County
    Lynwood W. Lewis, Jr.
    B. Wayne Coleman
    Write-in
    TOTALS

    ACCOMACK
    COUNTY
    3191
    3382
    3
    6576

    MATHEWS
    COUNTY
    620
    1222
    0
    1842

    NORFOLK CITY
    4909
    4502
    5
    9416

    NORTHAMPTON
    COUNTY
    1387
    961
    0
    2348

    VIRGINIA
    BEACH CITY
    90
    108
    0
    198

    TOTAL
    10197
    10175
    8
    20380

    Results
    provided by the Virginia State Board of Elections

  • Craig Scott

    State of Virginia
    Results
    100% Precincts Reporting

    Precincts Reporting: 56/56

    2014 Special Election – UNOFFICIAL
    RESULTS

    Lynwood W. Lewis, Jr. – DEM
    B. Wayne Coleman – REP
    Write-in –

    Member Senate
    of Virginia – 6th District
    10200
    10190
    8

    TOTAL
    10200
    10190
    8

    50%
    49.96%
    0.04%

    Results provided by the
    Virginia State Board of Elections