Moran feeling the heat?Politics

Before Chairman Terry McAuliffe made his announcement to officially seek the Democratic nomination for governor, former Del. Brian Moran, another candidate for the nomination, issued an appeal to his fellow candidates to not accept out-of-state campaign donations through June 9.

The election should not be about “who can raise more money from national donors,” Moran said. “Virginia Democrats should choose our nominee.”

This has prompted Norm Leahy to question how long Moran will actually stay in the race, Michael at “The Write Side” to call Moran “desperate“, and Greg at BVBL to call the whole nomination campaign a “circus“.

But is Moran deserving of all these arrows?

Generally, candidates have to point out their differences with challengers, and perhaps the biggest difference amongst two Northern Virginia liberals is their ability to be influenced from out-of-state sources. So, it appears that Moran is making a conscious effort to the electorate to paint McAuliffe as the outsider.

The real question is not whether Moran is going to drop-out or if this is a desperate move – it’s whether this is an effective tactic.

Or, is keeping your mouth shut a better one?

  • http://www.bearingdrift.com Brian Kirwin

    Moran is fighting for his political life. The nomination was his, in my opinion, against Deeds, but T-Mac will either beat Moran or make him spend buckets to hobble into November. But I don’t think dropping out is an option.

    Deeds is quickly being a very distant third. I’m not sure purposely staying silent and invisible hoping for two frontrunners to pummel each other is a recipe for victory.

  • http://www.vbprogressives.com Joel McDonald

    I don’t think Deeds can win the primary in this race, and McAuliffe could make it difficult for Moran to secure the nomination himself. I’m not happy with this situation. This is becoming a crazy money game, and I think Moran has made a good call in challenging both Deeds and McAuliffe to raise financial support from within the state. If presidential candidates can’t receive contributions from non-citizens, why should gubernatorial candidates be allowed to receive contributions from out of state? I’m not really pushing for legislation on this, but I think it’s a fair question, especially when you have the former DNC chair running to be chief executive of a state that he’s had little political involvement in.